Multiplex Genome Editing with CRISPR-Cpf1

Posted by Beth Kenkel on May 9, 2017 10:12:15 AM

There’s a new development for CRISPR-Cpf1 genome editing!  A recent paper from Feng Zhang's lab describes how to use Cpf1 for multiplex genome editing.  For a few reasons, Cpf1 is a simplified system for editing multiple targets compared to Cas9.  Read on to learn more about Cpf1 multiplexing.  For an in-depth review of Cpf1, check out this blog post or see Addgene's CRISPR guide page for a review of Cas9.  For a brief comparison of Cpf1 vs. Cas9, see the table below.

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Topics: CRISPR

Plasmids 101: Fluorescent Protein Timers

Posted by Tyler Ford on May 4, 2017 10:30:00 AM

Even before fluorescent proteins (FPs) came into wide use, there were a variety of ways to monitor cell, organelle, and protein localization. For instance, you might dye your cells and look at them under a microscope, fractionate samples to isolate particular organelles and their contents, or perform in situ hybridization experiments. In many cases fluorescent proteins have usurped old methods or complemented them in ways that make them much easier. A special class of FPs, the FP timers, add an entire new dimension to monitoring localization; using FP timers, researchers can look at a single image of a cell and understand how protein localization changes over time.
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Topics: Plasmids 101, Fluorescent Proteins

How to Design Your gRNA for CRISPR Genome Editing

Posted by Guest Blogger on May 3, 2017 11:00:00 AM

This Post was updated on May 3, 2017 with additional information and resources. 

This post was contributed by guest blogger, Addgene Advisory Board member, and Associate Director of the Genetic Perturbation Platform at the Broad Institute, John Doench.

CRISPR technology has made it easier than ever both to engineer specific DNA edits and to perform functional screens to identify genes involved in a phenotype of interest. This blog post will discuss differences between these approaches, as well as provide updates on how best to design gRNAs. You can also find validated gRNAs for your next experiment in Addgene's Validated gRNA Sequence Datatable.

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Topics: Plasmid How To, Genome Engineering, Lab Tips, CRISPR

Tips for Getting a Faculty Position

Posted by Guest Blogger on May 2, 2017 10:30:00 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger Erik Snapp, Director of Graduate and Postdoctoral Programs at Janelia Research Campus.

Eight years ago, I decided to write a "how to" manual on applying for faculty positions in biomedical science. My motivation was to share my experiences from my own job search and my time on faculty search committees. Having successfully navigated the trials and tribulations of the process, I’ve provided guidance and mentoring to several people that found my insights helpful. All went on to get faculty positions at top state colleges, private universities, and medical schools.

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Topics: Career

SciComm with the Experts at Science in the News Part 2

Posted by Tyler Ford on Apr 27, 2017 10:30:00 AM

This is the second half of a two-part interview with Vini Mani and Amy Gilson from Science in the News (SITN) at Harvard University.

There are tons of ways you can get involved in science communication. In this second half of our conversation with Vini Mani and Amy Gilson from SITN, we discuss some of the many things you can do start your own science communication student group and get more involved with your local community. What do Vini and Amy say is the quickest way to get things started? Set up your own Science by the Pint series and organize evens where scientists can grab a beer and chat about their work at a local bar. It doesn't have to be crazy complicated! Listen to the full podcast for more great science communication tips or listen to the chapters we've broken down below for specific topics discussed during the interview. Happy listening!

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Topics: Science Communication, Podcast

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