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Quick New Way to Deposit Plasmids: The Deposit Spreadsheet

Posted by Tyler Ford on Mar 8, 2017 10:15:21 AM

We've been updating our plasmid validation processes to make it easier for you to find what you need in the repository, but we're also making it easier than ever to deposit with Addgene. Our plasmid deposit process can be broken down into three simple steps:

  1. Send Plasmid Information to Addgene
  2. Materials Transfer Agreement approval (MTA)
  3. Send Plasmids to Addgene and Quality Control 

Steps 2 and 3 are usually very easy - our tech transfer team will communicate with your university directly to make sure the MTA is taken care of and, once we have all of your plasmid data, we’ll send you prepaid shipping materials (i.e. a deposit kit) with instructions on how to send liquid DNA or bacterial streaks of your plasmid back to us. Our scientists will contact you if any issues arise during the QC process. As the depositing scientist, you will have the most involvement with step 1 and, while data entry can be a chore, we’ve made it easier than ever to send us your plasmid information with the Deposit Spreadsheet.

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Topics: Inside Addgene

Tips for a 1st Time CRISPR User (by a 1st Time CRISPR User)

Posted by Leila Haery on Mar 7, 2017 10:30:00 AM

We all know that in the lab there are often little tricks that are essential for experiments but that nobody talks about. After months of troubleshooting, those people who did not tell you that essential thing ask incredulously, “You seriously didn’t add 3 microliters of 5 mM star anise?” This is something I was expecting when I set out to make my first CRISPR/Cas9 gene edit. I wanted to inactivate the gene BRAF (a kinase implicated in several human cancers) in A549 cells (a human lung cancer cell line), armed only with viruses obtained through Addgene’s viral service and the methods sections of scientific articles (gasp). To my delight, not only was I able to make the edits without any reagent-grade endangered Martian chicory root, but considering this is a needle in a haystack type of objective, it was surprisingly easy. It’s true, I CRISPRed. In this post, I’ll summarize the basic steps and analyses, and give what I think are the main tips for each step of performing and analyzing a gene edit using Addgene’s lentiviral CRISPR tools.

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Topics: CRISPR

Addgene Moves to NGS Verification Powered by seqWell

Posted by Mary Gearing on Mar 2, 2017 10:30:00 AM

Last year was an exciting one for Addgene as we introduced our long-awaited viral service, but we haven’t forgotten about our plasmids! Now, we’re improving our quality control processes using next-generation sequencing (NGS) services provided by seqWell. This new QC process will bring you full sequence data for new plasmids entering the repository. Read on to learn more about how this process works and what you can expect to see on our plasmid pages.

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Topics: Inside Addgene

CRISPRainbow and Genome Visualization

Posted by Mary Gearing on Feb 28, 2017 10:30:00 AM

Colorful CRISPR technologies are helping researchers visualize the genome and its organization within the nucleus, also called the 4D nucleome. Visualizing specific loci has historically been difficult, as techniques like fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and chromosome capture suffer from low resolution and can’t be used in vivo. Some researchers have used fluorescently tagged DNA-binding proteins to label certain loci, but this approach is not scalable for every locus...unlike CRISPR. Early CRISPR labeling techniques allowed researchers to visualize nearly any single genomic locus, and recent advances have allowed scientists to track multiple genomic loci over time using all the colors of the CRISPRainbow.

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Topics: CRISPR, Fluorescent Proteins

Science Career Options

Posted by Emma Markham on Feb 23, 2017 8:30:14 AM



When preparing to graduate from university, many students are confronted with the question ‘what now?’ This is often a hard question to answer if you plan on leaving academia, but don’t quite know what you do want to do or even what careers are available to scientists. It is all too easy to get tunnel vision when working towards a specific goal, and when you realise that your goal might not lead to a career you actually want, you can feel lost. Use this post to explore the wide range of careers available to scientists and open your eyes to the many opportunities available to those who are scientifically minded!

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Topics: Career, Career Readiness

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