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Addgene’s Viral Service - Why Virus? Why Now?

Posted by Joanne Kamens on Mar 23, 2017 10:30:00 AM

In the middle of 2016 Addgene started distributing a small but growing catalog of ready-made AAV and Lentiviral preps. This new Viral Service represents Addgene’s largest new initiative since we started distributing plasmids in 2004. We’ve already distributed over 500 viral samples to scientists all over the world. Now that the service is successfully launched, I would like to thank some of the people and organizations who helped us reach this milestone.

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Topics: Viral Vectors

Quick Guide to All Things Lentivirus

Posted by Benoit Giquel on Mar 21, 2017 10:30:00 AM

If you are interested in using lentiviral vectors to introduce your favourite gene into your favourite cell line or into primary cells, this blog article will give you some tips to plan your experiment using the lentiviral vector system.

Viral vectors have been increasingly popular in fundamental and applied research since their first use in the early 90’s to genetically modify primary cells. Amongst the different vectors used, lentiviral vector constructs have proven very useful due to their ability to infect both dividing and non-dividing cells, including stem cells. These properties make lentiviral vectors fantastic options for delivering shRNA, CRISPR/Cas9 components, and fluorescent sensors.

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Topics: Viral Vectors

SciComm with the Experts at Science in the News Part 1

Posted by Tyler Ford on Mar 16, 2017 9:06:22 AM

This is the first half of a two-part interview with Vini Mani and Amy Gilson from Science in the News at Harvard University.

Effective science communication is required to promote public support for research and to keep useful discoveries coming. At Addgene, we’re huge supporters of science communication. To help you think about ways to effectively communicate your science, we sat down with Vini Mani and Amy Gilson from Science in the News, a graduate student organization that works to promote science communication. Science in the News hosts a podcastseminars, a blog, conferences, and more for non-scientists. These programs are all run and organized by graduate student researchers. That’s right, #ActualLivingScientists, eager to communicate their science. In this first half of our two-part interview with Vini and Amy, we’ll discuss the types of programs SITN runs and learn how they think about communicating science.

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Topics: Scientific Sharing, Science Communication, Podcast

Cancer and the Immune System: Deciphering the Relationship

Posted by Guest Blogger on Mar 14, 2017 10:30:00 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger Subhadra Jayaraman, a doctoral candidate at Binghamton University

Cancer is one of the greatest examples of survival of the fittest. Cancer cells find a way to grow haywire, access and create more vasculature to feed themselves, use the blood stream to commute to and invade multiple organs, and most importantly escape the immune mechanisms of the host. The cause, manifestation, diagnosis, recurrence, and treatment of cancer have been extensively explored. Biologists have attempted to study cancer from every possible angle to leave no stone unturned, but cancer has been producing landslide after landslide, only adding more stones to the field.

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Topics: Cancer

What Do I Do Now? Academic v. Non-Academic Career Decisions

Posted by Joanne Kamens on Mar 9, 2017 10:40:00 AM

One of the less acknowledged perks of scientific and technical training is that these educational paths prepare you for a vast selection of career options.  Scientists are certainly following many diverse career paths these days.  A recent National Science Foundation study showed that 57% of PhDs in US Biomedical workforce will NOT go into “traditional” academic positions. More recently, I have been hearing exit survey data from postdoctoral programs in the Boston area that demonstrate that 85% of leaving postdocs pursue a career outside the traditional academic silo to tenured professor.  Non-academia encompasses millions of choices including pharma, tech transfer, management consulting, science communication, policy and the diverse options in nonprofit science. No one list can ever encompass them all. We can’t designate non-academic jobs as “alternative” anymore.

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Topics: Career, Career Readiness

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