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Mary Gearing

Mary Gearing is a Scientist at Addgene. She got her start as a Science Communications Intern writing for the Addgene blog and website. As a full-time Addgenie, she still enjoys blogging about CRISPR and other cool plasmids!

Recent Posts

Back to Bacteria: CRISPR gRNA Multiplexing Using tRNAs

Posted by Mary Gearing on Jun 2, 2015 2:06:00 PM

In the short time since its development, CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing has been used to study the effect of gene knockout in vivo and in vitro, as well as to insert targeted mutations through homologous recombination. To further increase the utility of CRISPR/Cas9, it will be necessary to improve its multiplexing capacity. Multiplexing is key due to the natural redundancy of biological pathways;  to observe a phenotype, the modification of multiple genes is often necessary.

Guide RNAs (gRNAs) are commonly packaged in 400-500 bp cassettes containing the RNA pol III promoter, gRNA and pol III terminator. These relatively large cassettes (considering the gRNA itself is ~100 bases) limit the number of gRNAs that can be packaged together in a single vector. In addition, the pol III promoter is relatively weak, and low expression of gRNAs from these constructs could lower genome editing efficiency.

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Topics: Plasmid Technology, Genome Engineering, CRISPR

Cre-ating New Methods for Site-specific Recombination in Drosophila

Posted by Mary Gearing on May 12, 2015 9:32:10 AM

Cre-lox recombination is an incredibly useful molecular biology tool, but like any biological system, it has certain drawbacks. First, the efficiency of Cre recombination varies for different constructs and cell types. Second, Cre may induce recombination at pseudo- or cryptic loxP sites (estimated to occur at a frequency of 1.2 per megabase in mammals), leading to DNA damage and developmental aberrations. In multiple systems, Cre itself, without the presence of a floxed construct, may produce a phenotype. This problem is especially stark in Drosophila, where expression of Cre from the standard UAS/GAL4 system is toxic to proliferating cells. A Cre-estrogen receptor ligand binding domain-fusion can prevent this toxicity, but with the caveat of partial rather than complete recombination. If you’re looking to use site-specific recombination in Drosophila, read on to learn about new recombinases suitable for this system.

Gerald Rubin’s lab sought to make complex genome modifications in Drosophila using multiple recombinases. To make multiple, precise genome edits, the recombinases used must have high activity and specificity with low cross-reactivity, as well as low toxicity.

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Topics: Plasmid Technology, Cre-lox, Drosophila

Evolution of Brainbow: Using Cre-lox for Multicolor Labeling of Neurons

Posted by Mary Gearing on Apr 24, 2015 10:39:00 AM

CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing may be the hot new way to manipulate gene expression, but other gene manipulation systems remain valuable to biology. Cre-lox recombination, discovered in the 1980s, is one of the most important ways to spatially and temporally control gene expression, especially in in vivo models, and new Cre-lox based technologies are still being developed today. In this post, I will highlight the evolution of the  Brainbow multicolor labeling system - a perfect example of the continued utility of Cre-lox. Check out our previous blog post, Plasmids 101: Cre-lox, if you need a quick primer on how Cre-lox recombination works.

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Topics: Plasmid Technology, Genome Engineering, Fluorescent Proteins

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