Leila Haery

Leila Haery is a Research Scientist at Addgene and is interested in science education.

Recent Posts

How to Write a Scientific Review Article

Posted by Leila Haery on Feb 16, 2017 10:30:00 AM

Writing a review article is a wonderful way to develop and exercise your scientist skill set. If you dread the thought of writing a review, or if you’re currently stuck trying to write one, hopefully this post will help you get things moving - remember you're becoming an expert in your field and are the perfect person to be writing the review! Doing so is a great way to develop your ability to write, to read efficiently, to search the literature, and to synthesize a large volume of information: basically, a scientist’s tool kit.

Read More >

Topics: Career, Career Readiness

MXS Chaining

Posted by Leila Haery on Feb 7, 2017 10:30:00 AM

High-throughput cloning, in a nutshell, is the systematic combination of different genetic sequences into plasmid DNA. In high throughput cloning techniques, although the specific sequences of the genetic elements may differ (e.g., a set of various mammalian promoters), the same cloning procedure can be used to incorporate each element into the final construct. This strategy can be used to build vectors with diverse functions, and thus, is used in many biological fields. In synthetic biology for example, high-throughput cloning can be used to combine the functions of different genetic elements to generate non-natural tools such as novel biological circuits or sensors. Given the expanding palette of fluorescent proteins and the availability of powerful imaging technologies, the combination of multiple fluorescent protein sequences to develop diverse fluorescent reporters is a useful application of high-throughput cloning. MXS Chaining is one such technique and has been used to produce complex fluorescent reporter constructs. These fluorescent reporters can be used to detect structure and protein localization, as well as cellular processes like gene expression and cell migration (Sladitschek and Neveu, 2015).

Read More >

Topics: Fluorescent Proteins, Plasmid Cloning

Top Requested Lentivirus and AAV of 2016

Posted by Leila Haery on Jan 6, 2017 10:56:47 AM

In July 2016, we launched our Viral Service and began delivering ready-to-use lentivirus and adeno-associated virus (AAV) to scientists around the world. We began with only a few inventory items offered domestically, but by the end of 2016, we expanded our viral inventory to 25 lentiviruses and 25 AAVs. These viruses have been distributed in over 200 packages to more than 20 countries. With this initial success, we will continue to provide and expand this diverse and useful collection of tools so that researchers around the world can accelerate their work. After all, as we like to sayat Addgene, productivity is infectious.

Curious which viruses researchers have found the most useful so far? We crunched the numbers on our Viral Service (and then we crunched them again) to find the most requested lentivirus and AAV of 2016.

The top viruses of 2016 were (drumroll please)...

Read More >

Topics: Fun, News, Viral Vectors

5 Tips for Troubleshooting Viral Transductions

Posted by Leila Haery on Aug 11, 2016 10:23:59 AM

An estimated 320,000 viruses can infect mammals. Even more abundant are the Earth’s estimated 1031 bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria), many of which are doing important work in our microbiomes. Given that viruses are everywhere and doing everything, it can be annoying when we try to use them in an experiment and they don't do anything.

Read More >

Topics: Viral Vectors

Using Virus in Your Research - A Primer for Beginners

Posted by Leila Haery on Jun 7, 2016 11:09:27 AM


We’ve all had the feeling where it seems like we’re the only one in the room who doesn’t know about an important scientific principle.

Example Scenario

Important science person: ...and then we found out that it wasn’t a deoxynucleotide, it was a dideoxynucleotide!

Room full of important science people: (laughter in unison)

You: (nervous laughter)

Read More >

Topics: Viral Vectors

Subscribe to Our Blog