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Resume Writing for Non-academic Science Careers

Posted by Guest Blogger on Dec 18, 2014 11:06:00 AM

This post was contributed by Theresa Liao of the University of British Columbia.

When transitioning from an academic science career path to a non-academic one, one of the biggest changes (and perhaps challenges) is the need to present yourself using a resume. Indeed, instead of having all the pages in a Curricula Vitae to showcase your publications, academic performances, and research experiences, you now have merely two pages to convince your potential employer that you are the right candidate for the job.

How can you incorporate the skills developed during graduate school into your resume? How can you stand out among all the candidates applying for the position?

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Topics: Career, Science Communication, Career Readiness

Choosing Your Fluorescent Proteins for Multi-Color Imaging

Posted by Guest Blogger on Oct 9, 2014 11:00:00 AM

This post was contributed by Kurt Thorn of the Nikon Imaging Center at UCSF.

A common requirement for live cell imaging experiments is the ability to follow multiple fluorescently tagged species simultaneously. To do so with fluorescent protein labels requires multiple fluorescent proteins whose excitation and emission spectra differ sufficiently for them to be imaged in distinct fluorescent channels on the microscope. With the proliferation of fluorescent proteins in recent years, there are many fluorescent protein combinations that can be imaged together, but this also means that the choice of fluorescent proteins requires some thought.

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Topics: Lab Tips, Fluorescent Proteins

Advice for Moving Into Sales After Your Science Postdoc

Posted by Guest Blogger on Aug 21, 2014 11:15:00 AM

This guest blog post was contributed by Seán Mac Fhearraigh, PhD, of www.phdadvice.com.

I sold out, well in part that’s what leaving academia feels like for a lot of researchers. For many years I struggled with the questions of “Will I leave academia?” and "What type of science careers would would make a good fit for me?" Whatever would I do next and what options lie ahead of me? Like a considerable number of researchers, I had high hopes of securing tenure in a British or Irish University where I would continue on with my academic dream of studying cell division. However, after 6 years in the business of western blots and cloning, I decided to pack it in. I had just started month 8 of my 3 year Post-Doctoral contract at the University of Cambridge and knew it was time to leave. I really enjoyed my time in the lab, my colleagues and what I was researching, but I decided I needed a new challenge.

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Topics: Career, Career Readiness

Data Freedom: The Expansion of Data Sharing in Research Publications

Posted by Guest Blogger on Aug 5, 2014 2:51:13 PM

This post was contributed by Jim Woodgett.


Public Library of Science (PLOS) created a stir earlier this year when it announced its data access and sharing policy. Since early March, the open access publisher has required authors to include a note as to where readers may locate data supporting the research reported in PLOS publications. The policy was not an overnight revelation, rather it was the result of consultations between researchers and publishers. Nonetheless, the initial release caused a storm as the organization left open the question of how much data was necessary and reasonable. PLOS has since clarified their data sharing policy and recently announced that of the 16,000 manuscripts that had been processed since the declaration, only a small fraction (<1%) of authors have asked for advice about the scope of the policy. End of story? Not quite.

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Topics: Scientific Sharing

3 Challenges in Plant Synthetic Biology

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jul 22, 2014 1:46:10 PM

This post was contributed by Nikolai Braun and Keira Havens, co-founders of Revolution Bioengineering. Read their previous blog post about how they started their company here.

The first transgenic plant was engineered over 30 years ago, but plant synthetic biology is still in its infancy. A long timeline from transformation to testing and a lack of well-characterized genetic tools make it challenging to engineer a specific function in these multicellular organisms. However, the rewards are great if you take the plunge – plants are the foundation of life on earth, and opportunities abound to build better fuels, feeds, foods, and fibers. And because working with plants can be challenging, there are a lot of unexplored areas in plant biotechnology that are ripe with opportunity. We’ve decided to jump into one of those unexplored areas with our color-changing flower, but to do that we’ve had to navigate the challenges involved in plant synthetic biology.

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Topics: Synthetic Biology, Plant Biology, Plasmid Kits

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