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A Max Juchheim

Max is a molecular biologist who does quality control sequence analysis for Addgene. He did his undergraduate studies at MIT where he worked on yeast genetics, and his graduate work at Harvard Medical School, where he studied mouse models of colon cancer. He loves science, but usually prefers to work "behind the scenes", so he's not quite sure how he was roped into writing for Addgene's blog!

Recent Posts

Plasmids 101: NGS Quality Control for Pooled Libraries

Posted by A Max Juchheim on Oct 26, 2017 9:59:02 AM

In addition to single plasmids, Addgene also distributes pooled plasmid libraries containing hundreds, thousands, or even a million plasmids. These libraries are some of Addgene’s most exciting and versatile offerings! We recently re-amplified our distribution stock of the Brunello Human gRNA library, and we thought it would be a good time to talk about the amplification and verification processes we use to ensure high-quality library distribution. You can also use these tips as a starting point when you need to amplify a library for your own experiments.

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Topics: Inside Addgene, Plasmids 101

History of Fluorescent Proteins

Posted by A Max Juchheim on Aug 7, 2017 9:58:40 AM

Luminescent molecules are very useful tools because we can easily detect and measure the light they emit. Proteins that give off light include chemiluminescent proteins, like luciferases, as well as fluorescent ones, like Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). These molecules occur naturally in bioluminescent organisms, but their real power lies in the clever ways sceintists have adapted them for use in the laboratory.

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Topics: Fluorescent Proteins

Plasmids 101: Cre-lox

Posted by A Max Juchheim on Jan 13, 2015 10:47:00 AM

In previous posts for our Plasmids 101 series, we examined a number of important plasmid elements – promoters, origins of replication, protein tags, and antibiotic resistance markers (just to name a few). In this edition, we’re going to take a look at a very interesting tool that can be used for creating (excuse the pun) specific, targeted DNA modifications in transgenic animals, embryonic stem cells, and/or tissue-specific cell types: Cre-lox recombination.

What is Cre-lox?

The Cre-lox system is a technology that can be used to induce site-specific recombination events. The system consists of two components derived from the P1 bacteriophage: the Cre recombinase and a loxP recognition site. The P1 bacteriophage uses these components as part of its natural viral lifecycle, and researchers have adapted the components for use in genome manipulation.

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Topics: Plasmid Technology, Plasmid Elements, Plasmids 101

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